Greedy Lawyers Falling for Email Scam

As some of you know, we started a site called The Spam Email Graveyard several years ago as an experiment. We forward all of our spam/scam emails there.

Eventually, people started finding it by searching for the exact terms in some of the messages like the phony names of people in far away countries who just happen to have millions of dollars they would love to give away. Lucky you! More recently though, we are seeing a more subtle scam aimed at greedy lawyers. (Not all lawyers are greedy, but the greedy ones seem to be stupid.) Anyway, they get an unsolicited email from someone in a foreign country needing either help with a messy divorce, or a business with some kind of contract dispute. And they have deep pockets. Cha-ching!

Unfortunately (for them) a number of greedy lawyers have fallen for this scam. No, really. Usually it involves a large cashier’s check ($200,000) that they are supposed to deposit in the firm account and then send a small amount ($5000 to $10,000) back to the poor divorcee. The cashier’s check looks good, their local bank accepts it and the greedy lawyer promptly wires money to the scammer. A few days to a week later they find out that the cashiers check is a fraud (usually they scramble the routing number to keep it bouncing around the bank system longer) and the lawyer is out the money he wired. Oops. Some try to sue the banks claiming they should have know the check was fake. So far though, none of the lawyers have won that argument.

What’s most interesting to us the number of lawyers who are openly commenting on our posting of the scam email (found here with the simple subject line of: “Hi Counsel”) freely admitting how greedy and/or stupid they were . . . until they decided to do a Google search and found our little site. For some it was just in time.

Gotta love those greedy lawyers! Would love to have you take a look at that page and leave some of your own comments. Think you’d fall for something like that?

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